Recent Changes

Tuesday, October 4

  1. page Janet Hamilton (1795-1873) edited ... {hamilton.png} (Scottish Poetry Library) ... and learning (correct) for Hamilton ... o…
    ...
    {hamilton.png}
    (Scottish Poetry Library)
    ...
    and learning (correct) for Hamilton
    ...
    of them (correct) (Orlando). She
    In the 1850s, shortly after learning to write, Hamilton started losing her eye sight. She continued to produce poetry in the late 1850s and 1860s, by dictating them to her eldest son James (ODNB). Her poetry was written in English and in Scots (traditional Scottish dialect), as she was eventually fluent in both. All of her published poetry occurred after her blindness (Orlando), including Poems and Essays (1863), Poems of Purpose and Sketches in Prose of Scottish Peasant Life and Character in Auld Langsyne, Sketches of Local Scenes and Characters (1865), Poems and Ballads (1868), Poems, Essays, and Sketches (1870). Toward the end of her life, her poetry became quite popular, receiving praise in English and Scottish periodicals (Orlando). She often had visitors who commented on her humour, wit, and impressive ability to recite ballads (Orlando). She was bed-ridden for three years, and died on 30 October 1873. She was buried on 4 November in Old Monkland cemetery, Coatbridge. Many gathered at her funeral in Langloan to commemorate her life and work, as she inspired many working-class writers with her boundary-pushing poetry and her self-taught education (Orlando).
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/JanetHamiltonFountain.JPG/450px-JanetHamiltonFountain.JPG} File:JanetHamiltonFountain.JPG
    (view changes)
    9:06 pm
  2. page Janet Hamilton (1795-1873) edited ... {hamilton.png} (Scottish Poetry Library) ... 12 October 1795 (not 14) , 1795, near Car…
    ...
    {hamilton.png}
    (Scottish Poetry Library)
    ...
    12 October 1795 (not 14) ,1795, near Carhill, Shotts, Lanarkshire (correct),Lanarkshire, to a
    Her father returned to shoe-making, and hired a young man as his assistant named John Hamilton (1783-1878). Janet and John married in February 1809 in a traditional Scots-style wedding, when she was 13 years old (Orlando). They resided in Langloan for the rest of their lives, where they had 10 children together, with seven children- five boys and two girls, surviving (ODNB). In her later teens, from ages 17-19, Hamilton began composing religious verses, and since she could not write, she had her husband transcribe around 20 of them (correct) (Orlando). She was inspired by the Bible, and by other influential writers such as Robert Burns and the Scots ballad tradition (Orlando). Hamilton taught all seven of her children to read and spell (because she became literate) by the age of five (Orlando), as she believed in education despite her working-class upbringing. Around the age of 50, Hamilton began to teach herself to write, which led to her contributing to several essays that advocated important topics to her, such as women’s education and workers’ self-improvement (ODNB).
    In the 1850s, shortly after learning to write, Hamilton started losing her eye sight. She continued to produce poetry in the late 1850s and 1860s, by dictating them to her eldest son James (ODNB). Her poetry was written in English and in Scots (traditional Scottish dialect), as she was eventually fluent in both. All of her published poetry occurred after her blindness (Orlando), including Poems and Essays (1863), Poems of Purpose and Sketches in Prose of Scottish Peasant Life and Character in Auld Langsyne, Sketches of Local Scenes and Characters (1865), Poems and Ballads (1868), Poems, Essays, and Sketches (1870). Toward the end of her life, her poetry became quite popular, receiving praise in English and Scottish periodicals (Orlando). She often had visitors who commented on her humour, wit, and impressive ability to recite ballads (Orlando). She was bed-ridden for three years, and died on 30 October 1873. She was buried on 4 November in Old Monkland cemetery, Coatbridge. Many gathered at her funeral in Langloan to commemorate her life and work, as she inspired many working-class writers with her boundary-pushing poetry and her self-taught education (Orlando).
    ...
    “Janet Hamilton”. Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles. Web. 2 February 2015.
    Boos, Florence S. “Janet Hamilton”. Dictionary of National Biography. Web. 1 February 2015.
    Work Cited:
    Works Cited
    Hamilton, Janet. Poems, sketches and essays. Ed. James Hamilton, George Gilfillan, Alexander Wallace. Glasgow: James Maclehose and Sons. 1880. Digital file.
    (view changes)
    9:05 pm

Thursday, April 21

  1. page Thomas Hood - Comic Poems edited ... The poem titled “No!” in this particular collection, "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poe…
    ...
    The poem titled “No!” in this particular collection, "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems” was titled “November” in previous publications by Edward Moxon and company, such as in their third volume of “The Works of Thomas Hood” (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The variation in the title of the poem between editions is logical because both the refrain “no” and the pun “November” are memorable aspects of the poem. The poem was written by Thomas Hood in 1844 (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The poem is set in London on a rainy, foggy, and smoggy day, where everything was hidden from site. According to the Lonely Planet Weather2Travel London has on average 21 days of rain during the 30 days of November, which amounts to an average of 2 hours of sunshine per day in November. It is not only objects, celestial bodies, and the physical landscape which Thomas Hood is indicating he can’t see but also things such as social “recognitions of familiar people” and “news from any foreign coast.” This lack of visible action both outside and socially gives the poem a feeling of stillness, as there are literally “no” things to see. The park and ring he is speaking of is either referring to Hyde or Regency Park in London where, on a nice afternoon, gentility would gather and socialize.
    Although the setting of the poem is bleak Hood gives the poem levity and playfulness by using repetition, exaggeration, and an extended pun. Each line begins with “no” which builds up to the final one word line at the end of the poem, “November.” The poem contains rhyming couplets in lines 1-2, 4-5, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 16-17, and 18-19. In addition, Line 3 rhymes with line 6, line 20 with 22, and line 21 with 24. A rhyming triplet occurs in lines 16, 17, and 18. Anaphora is a rhetorical device that consists of repeating a word or series of words at the beginning of neighboring clauses to thereby lend the clauses emphasis. This device is used throughout the poem at beginning of the lines and within some lines with the use of “no.” Alliteration, a repetition of consonant sounds occurs frequently in the poem, such as in line 22, “no shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees.” The use of the alliteration in these instances gives the poem a building rhythmic momentum which musically carries the readers attention to the final pun at the end.
    Recommended Reading
    Jerrold, Walter. Thomas Hood: His Life and times. New York: Greenwood, 1969. Print.
    Broderip, Frances Freeling. Memorials of Thomas Hood. London: Moxon, 1869. Print.
    Hood, Thomas, and Epes Sargent. The Complete Poetical Works of Thomas Hood: With a Biographical Sketch and Notes. Boston: Phillips, Sampson, 1857. Print.

    Works Cited
    Hood, Thomas. The Comic Poems of Thomas Hood. New Edition ed. London: Moxon, 1870. Print. The Pocket Ser.
    Flint, Joy. "Article: Hood, Thomas." Oxford DNB. Oxford University Press. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    ...
    Feb. 2016.
    Jerrold, Walter. Thomas Hood: His Life and times. New York: Greenwood, 1969. Print.
    Broderip, Frances Freeling. Memorials of Thomas Hood. London: Moxon, 1869. Print.
    Hood, Thomas, and Epes Sargent. The Complete Poetical Works of Thomas Hood: With a Biographical Sketch and Notes. Boston: Phillips, Sampson, 1857. Print.

    Digital Images
    Thomas Hood. N.d. National Portrait Gallery, London. Thomas Hood Wikipedia. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    (view changes)
    4:13 pm
  2. page Thomas Hood - Comic Poems edited ... Cover: Blue with golden printed insignia "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon&qu…
    ...
    Cover: Blue with golden printed insignia "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"
    Spine: Blue with golden decoration "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"
    Illustrations: ThereIllustrations:There is one
    Preface: The preface in this book was written by “Thomas Hood the Younger” (1835-1874) who was born in Lake House, Wanstead, Essex to Thomas Hood (1799-1845) and Jane, Reyonlds (1791-1846). In the preface he describes Thomas Hood seniors character as a person and as a prolific writer. It is fitting that his son would write about him as he had an inside look into his father’s character and inspiration. A shocking element of Hood’s life that is revealed by his son is that he was an “invalid” during much of his career, and yet “could supply mirth for millions while he himself was propped up with pillows on the bed of sickness” (vi). This period of time apparently gave Hood time to reflect on the extent of suffering of others, and thus the nature of his comedy was of a “well-balanced mind to avoid infliction of pain” (vi). made to Victorian Poetry as whole. The preface was written after Hood's death in May of 1845. In this way the preface serves as a eulogy or way to inform readers of Hood's significant contributions to Victorian poetry. Included in the preface by Hood’s son is part of a pervious preface T. Hood himself wrote from his book, "Hoods Own.” This addition from the T. Hood helps further contextualize his personal views regarding his writing process.
    UVIC call number: PR4796C6
    ...
    November!
    (Hood.350)
    ...
    of "No!":
    The poem titled “No!” in this particular collection, "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems” was titled “November” in previous publications by Edward Moxon and company, such as in their third volume of “The Works of Thomas Hood” (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The variation in the title of the poem between editions is logical because both the refrain “no” and the pun “November” are memorable aspects of the poem. The poem was written by Thomas Hood in 1844 (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The poem is set in London on a rainy, foggy, and smoggy day, where everything was hidden from site. According to the Lonely Planet Weather2Travel London has on average 21 days of rain during the 30 days of November, which amounts to an average of 2 hours of sunshine per day in November. It is not only objects, celestial bodies, and the physical landscape which Thomas Hood is indicating he can’t see but also things such as social “recognitions of familiar people” and “news from any foreign coast.” This lack of visible action both outside and socially gives the poem a feeling of stillness, as there are literally “no” things to see. The park and ring he is speaking of is either referring to Hyde or Regency Park in London where, on a nice afternoon, gentility would gather and socialize.
    Although the setting of the poem is bleak Hood gives the poem levity and playfulness by using repetition, exaggeration, and an extended pun. Each line begins with “no” which builds up to the final one word line at the end of the poem, “November.” The poem contains rhyming couplets in lines 1-2, 4-5, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 16-17, and 18-19. In addition, Line 3 rhymes with line 6, line 20 with 22, and line 21 with 24. A rhyming triplet occurs in lines 16, 17, and 18. Anaphora is a rhetorical device that consists of repeating a word or series of words at the beginning of neighboring clauses to thereby lend the clauses emphasis. This device is used throughout the poem at beginning of the lines and within some lines with the use of “no.” Alliteration, a repetition of consonant sounds occurs frequently in the poem, such as in line 22, “no shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees.” The use of the alliteration in these instances gives the poem a building rhythmic momentum which musically carries the readers attention to the final pun at the end.
    ...
    Hood, Thomas. The Comic Poems of Thomas Hood. New Edition ed. London: Moxon, 1870. Print. The Pocket Ser.
    Flint, Joy. "Article: Hood, Thomas." Oxford DNB. Oxford University Press. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    ...
    Feb. 2016.
    Digital Images
    Thomas Hood. N.d. National Portrait Gallery, London. Thomas Hood Wikipedia. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    Digital image. Little Stour Books, N.p.. n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    E.M. Eng. 386. UVIC. Winter 2016.

    (view changes)
    4:12 pm
  3. page Thomas Hood - Comic Poems edited ... (National Portrait Gallery, London) Gallery.date:unknown) {355262292.jpg} Hood's ... (…

    ...
    (National Portrait Gallery, London)Gallery.date:unknown) {355262292.jpg} Hood's
    ...
    (Little Stour Books)
    Paratextual
    Books.1870)
    Para-textual
    Information
    Title: "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"

    Date: 1870

    Cover: Blue with golden printed insignia "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"
    Spine: Blue with golden decoration "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"
    Illustrations:ThereIllustrations: There is one
    ...
    and Jane, Nee Reyonlds (1791-1846).
    ...
    Hood seniors character/journeycharacter as a
    ...
    whole. The preface, while not dated, most likelypreface was written
    ...
    May of 1845 as this edition of the book was published in 1870.1845. In this
    ...
    preface by Hoods son,Hood’s son is part
    ...
    book, "Hoods Own."Own.” This addition from the T. Hood helps further contextualize his personal views regarding his writing process.
    UVIC call number: PR4796C6
    Textual Information
    Type of Poems: Comic and Lyrical
    Book Traces: n/a
    Author
    Author Bio: “Hood,(From Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, see Works Cited)
    “Hood,
    Thomas (1799–1845),
    Hood returned to London in the autumn of 1817, much improved in health. He was busy engraving, working from home, and he joined a literary society. In one of his entertaining letters he wrote in 1821: ‘Truly I am T. Hood Scripsit et sculpsit—I am engraving and writing prose and Poetry by turns’ (Hood, 27). 1821 was a year of mixed fortune. His mother died. That summer, however, Taylor and Hessey (Keats's publishers) took over the London Magazine after the death of its editor in a duel. John Taylor had worked for Hood's father and invited the young Thomas to become sub-editor. Hood was in his element: ‘I dreamt articles, thought articles, wrote articles … The more irksome parts of authorship, such as the correction of the press, were to me labours of love’ (Jerrold, 99). His career as a literary journalist had begun.
    Apart from a novel, Tylney Hall (1834), some unremarkable prose, and minor writing for the stage, nearly all Hood's work, verse and prose, first appeared in magazines and annuals catering for the growing middle-class market. From 1821 to 1845 Hood was closely involved, as contributor or editor, with many of them, particularly theLondon Magazine, The Athenaeum, The Gem, the New Monthly Magazine, and Punch. He wrote—and illustrated, inventing visual puns—a series of Comic Annuals(1830–9), collected his magazine contributions into Whims and Oddities (1826 and 1827) and Whimsicalities (1844), and also published Hood's Magazine (1844–5). Hood wrote for a living, and was keenly alive to contemporary life and popular taste. His work provides insight into domestic reading and the development of periodical publishing in the first half of the nineteenth century.
    ...
    Near his death Hood engaged the hearts and consciences of his readers directly in a number of poems prompted by real incidents: ‘The Song of the Shirt’ (Punch, Christmas 1843) highlighted the plight of the underpaid seamstresses of the day; in 1844 ‘The Workhouse Clock’ addressed the hardship of the poor laws; ‘The Lay of the Labourer’, the suffering of the agricultural poor. ‘The Bridge of Sighs’, the purest poem of these public verses, sprang from a newspaper report of a suicide.
    In his short life Hood saw ‘Romantic’ change into ‘Victorian’: he took tea with Wordsworth, dined with Dickens. Hood's work mirrors this change. Much of his writing has intrinsic merit; some is memorable, its range impressive, its style often forward-looking, and all is valuable to anyone concerned with the transitional period, literary and social, which it reflects.”
    (From Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, see Works Cited)
    Arrangement: The book begins with a long narrative poem, “Miss Kilmansegg and her Precious Leg” which is 99 pages long, while the remaining poems are short in length in comparison. Due to no dates being attributed to any of the poems, it seems the only primary arrangement consideration was putting the longer poem at the beginning of the book.
    ...
    Bombay”, “Love”, “No!” and others.“No!”
    No!
    No sun--no moon!
    ...
    No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds--
    November!
    (pg.350)(Hood.350)
    Short Analysis of "No!":
    ...
    poem titled “No!”, also“No!” in this particular collection, "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems” was titled “November”,“November” in previous publications by Edward Moxon and company, such as in their third volume of “The Works of Thomas Hood” (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The variation in the title of the poem between editions is logical because both the refrain “no” and the pun “November” are memorable aspects of the poem. The poem was completedwritten by Thomas Hood in 1844.1844 (Cummings Study Guide.Web). The poem is likely set in
    ...
    the Lonely PlantetPlanet Weather2Travel London
    ...
    and socialize.
    Although

    Although
    the setting of the poem is bleak
    ...
    and playfulness with the use ofby using repetition, exaggeration,
    ...
    an extended pun: eachpun. Each line begins
    ...
    no bees.” The use of the alliteration in these instances gives the poem a building rhythmic momentum which musically carries the readers attention to the final pun at the end.
    Recommended Reading:
    -
    Reading
    Jerrold, Walter.
    Thomas Hood:
    ...
    Life and Times by Walter Jerrold
    -
    times. New York: Greenwood, 1969. Print.
    Broderip, Frances Freeling.
    Memorials of Thomas Hood by Tom Hood
    -
    Hood. London: Moxon, 1869. Print.
    Hood, Thomas, and Epes Sargent.
    The Complete
    ...
    Sketch and Notes, Volumes 1,2Notes. Boston: Phillips, Sampson, 1857. Print.
    Works Cited
    Hood, Thomas. The Comic Poems of Thomas Hood. New Edition ed. London: Moxon, 1870. Print. The Pocket Ser.
    ...
    Press. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    Cummings, Michael J. "November: A Study Guide." Cummings Study Guides. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    Digital Images
    Thomas Hood. N.d. National Portrait Gallery, London. Thomas Hood Wikipedia. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
    Digital image. Little Stour Books, N.p.. n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

    E.M. Eng. 386. UVIC. Winter 2016.

    (view changes)
    4:05 pm
  4. page Thomas Hood - Comic Poems edited Eliot May Dr. Allison Chapman English 386 February 15th, 2016 {thomas-hood-5.jpg} Portrait ..…
    Eliot May
    Dr. Allison Chapman
    English 386
    February 15th, 2016

    {thomas-hood-5.jpg} Portrait
    ...
    Unknown Artist (National Portrait Gallery, London) {355262292.jpg} Hood's Comic Poems (Little Stour Books)
    Paratextual Information
    Title: "The Pocket Series, Hood's Comic Poems, Moxon"
    (view changes)
    3:10 pm
  5. page Victorian Songs - Lyrics of the Affections and Nature by Edmund H Garrett edited Victorian Songs: Lyrics of the Affections and Nature is an anthology of Victorian lyrical poems, co…
    Victorian Songs: Lyrics of the Affections and Nature is an anthology of Victorian lyrical poems, collected and illustrated by Edmund H Garrett and published by Little Brown and Company in 1895. The book includes of the works of 45 well-known Victorian poets, such as Christina Rossetti, Thomas Hood and Alfred Tennyson. The poems are ordered throughout the book alphabetically. The variety of authors included in the book make it a great resource for discovering the best and most popular lyrical poetry of the time.
    ...
    in 1897. (Art of Print). He was
    ...
    his lifetime (CITE).(Wikipedia). The book
    {12737111_10153362447731845_51186548_o.jpg} The cover page of Victorian Songs. Note the gold ink of the title, borders and decorative flowers.
    The book itself was obtained at the McPherson library at the University of Victoria (PR1223 G3). It has a white cover that is detailed with golden lettering, flowers and borders as well as a crest that bears the french phrase “Dieu et mon droit”, the motto of the monarch of the United Kingdom that translates to “God and my right”. It is a gift book which is a departure from the Victorian trend of pocketbooks. The pages are very rugged and although the book is in good quality, it has clearly been well-used.
    ...
    Works Cited
    Dieu et mon droit." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.” Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.10 Jan 2016. Web.
    ...
    of Print. Web. http://www.artoftheprint.com/artistpages/garrett_edmund_garrett_nearmattakeesett.htm
    Garret, Edmund. “Victorian Songs: Lyrics of the Affections and Nature”. Boston: Little Brown and Company. Boston, 1895. Print.
    Edmund H. Garrett.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.” Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 29 April 2015.
    (view changes)
    12:47 pm
  6. page Victorian Songs - Lyrics of the Affections and Nature by Edmund H Garrett edited ... {12737111_10153362447731845_51186548_o.jpg} The cover page of Victorian Songs. Note the gold …
    ...
    {12737111_10153362447731845_51186548_o.jpg} The cover page of Victorian Songs. Note the gold ink of the title, borders and decorative flowers.
    The book itself was obtained at the McPherson library at the University of Victoria (PR1223 G3). It has a white cover that is detailed with golden lettering, flowers and borders as well as a crest that bears the french phrase “Dieu et mon droit”, the motto of the monarch of the United Kingdom that translates to “God and my right”. It is a gift book which is a departure from the Victorian trend of pocketbooks. The pages are very rugged and although the book is in good quality, it has clearly been well-used.
    Victorian poetry was well received in the United States, and its publications "satisfied an English desire for good reception". (Cohen 169). In the 1800s, several American literary periodicals -such as Harper's and Scribner's-began publishing Victorian poetry in the United States. This "satisfied an English desire for good reception" (Cohen 169), and the American publications that printed British poetry had more publication in England than English poetry itself (Cohen 169).
    {12722454_10153362447686845_1949318433_o.jpg} Name of the owner of the book, found on the backside of the title page.
    The book has an inscription directly behind the cover with the name “Eiran Izubre Garris”. There are many illustrations throughout the book, all drawn by Garrett who is credited as the illustrator. Almost each poem features a drawing of some sort, usually a drawing of a plant however there are more detailed drawings by Garrett placed throughout the book. The pages with illustrations are protected with a lining to preserve the quality of the illustration. The table of contents includes an illustration of a woman reading a book. This illustration is noteworthy, due to the red colour of the ink, which is a departure from the standard black ink used throughout the rest of the book, the only other instance of red ink within the book being the title page. Illustrated poetry was very popular within the Victorian era, and they often served as a means of highlighting particular themes in the poem. More information on illustrations in Victorian poetry can be found here.
    ...
    The Art of Print. “Edmund Henry Garrett”. The Art of Print.
    Garret, Edmund. “Victorian Songs: Lyrics of the Affections and Nature”. Boston: Little Brown and Company. Boston, 1895. Print.
    ...
    April 2015.
    Cohen, Michael. "E.C Stedman and the Invention of Victorian Poetry." Victorian Poetry 43.2 (2005): 186-88. JSTOR. Web.

    (view changes)
    12:31 pm

Wednesday, April 20

  1. file Tanya Rawa1.doc uploaded
    12:11 pm

More